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  The Three Rhymsters [The Chinese Fairy Book] O NCE there were three daughters in a family. The oldest one married a physician, the second ...

The Three Rhymsters [The Chinese Fairy Book]
 

The Three Rhymsters [The Chinese Fairy Book]

ONCE there were three daughters in a family. The oldest one married a physician, the second one married a magistrate; but the third, who was more than usually intelligent and a clever talker, married a farmer.

  Women’s Words Part Flesh And Blood [ The Chinese Fairy Book ] O NCE upon a time there were two brothers, who lived in the same house. And ...

 

Women’s Words Part Flesh And Blood

Women’s Words Part Flesh And Blood [The Chinese Fairy Book]

ONCE upon a time there were two brothers, who lived in the same house. And the big brother listened to his wife’s words, and because of them fell out with the little one. Summer had begun, and the time for sowing the high-growing millet had come. The little brother had no grain, and asked the big one to loan him some, and the big one ordered his wife to give it to him. But she took the grain, put it in a large pot and cooked it until it was done. Then she gave it to the little fellow. He knew nothing about it, and went and sowed his field with it. Yet, since the grain had been cooked, it did not sprout. Only a single grain of seed had not been cooked; so only a single sprout shot up. The little brother was hard-working and industrious by nature, and hence he watered and hoed the sprout all day long. And the sprout grew mightily, like a tree, and an ear of millet sprang up out of it like a canopy, large enough to shade half an acre of ground. In the fall the ear was ripe. Then the little brother took his ax and chopped it down. But no sooner had the ear fallen to the ground, than an enormous Roc came rushing down, took the ear in his beak and flew away. The little brother ran after him as far as the shore of the sea.

Jolly Calle [ Swedish Fairy Tales ] ONCE upon a time there was a boy called Jolly Calle who was always as happy as happy could be. He was ...

Jolly Calle [Swedish Fairy Tales]


Jolly Calle [Swedish Fairy Tales]

Jolly Calle [Swedish Fairy Tales]

ONCE upon a time there was a boy called Jolly Calle who was always as happy as happy could be. He was a poor boy and quite alone in the world, for he had lost both his father and mother. If anyone pitied him on account of this misfortune he would answer:

 The Isle Of Udröst [The Norwegian Fairy Book] Once upon a time there lived at Vaerö, not far from Röst, a poor fisherman, named Isaac. He h...

The Isle Of Udröst [The Norwegian Fairy Book]

 The Isle Of Udröst [The Norwegian Fairy Book]

Once upon a time there lived at Vaerö, not far from Röst, a poor fisherman, named Isaac. He had nothing but a boat and a couple of goats, which his wife fed as well as she could with fish leavings, and with the grass she was able to gather on the surrounding hills; but his whole hut was full of hungry children. Yet he was always satisfied with what God sent him. The only thing that worried him was his inability to live at peace with his neighbor. The latter was a rich man, thought himself entitled to far more than such a beggarly fellow as Isaac, and wanted to get him out of the way, in order to take for himself the anchorage before Isaac’s hut.

  Per Gynt [The Norwegian Fairy Book] In the old days there lived in Kvam a marksman by the name of Per Gynt. He was continually in the moun...

 

Per Gynt [The Norwegian Fairy Book]

Per Gynt [The Norwegian Fairy Book]

In the old days there lived in Kvam a marksman by the name of Per Gynt. He was continually in the mountains, where he shot bear and elk, for at that time there were more forests on the Fjäll, and all sorts of beasts dwelt in them. Once, late in the fall, when the cattle had long since been driven down from the mountain pastures, Per Gynt decided to go up on the Fjäll again. With the exception of three dairy-maids, all the herd-folk had already left the mountains. But when Per Gynt reached Hövringalm, where he intended to stay over-night in a herdsman’s hut, it already was so dark that he could not see his hand before his eyes. Then the dogs began to bark so violently that he felt quite uneasy. And suddenly his foot struck something, and when he took hold of it, it was cold, and large and slippery. Since he felt certain he had not left the path, he could not imagine what it might be; but he sensed that all was not in order.

The Witch’s Cat [Folk Tales Of Flanders] O nce upon a time there was a wicked old witch who lived all alone in the topmost chamber of a tal...

The Witch’s Cat [Folk Tales Of Flanders]

The Witch’s Cat [Folk Tales Of Flanders]

Once upon a time there was a wicked old witch who lived all alone in the topmost chamber of a tall and gloomy tower. There she sat day after day with her ugly head resting on her hands, peering out through a slit in the wall upon the countryside. Her only companion was a big black tom-cat, who sat by her side in the darkened chamber, his eyes shining like green fire in the gloom.

Why The Bear Has A Stumpy Tail [Folk Tales Of Flanders] O ne very cold winter, when the ground was covered with snow and the ponds and rive...

Why The Bear Has A Stumpy Tail [Folk Tales Of Flanders]

Why The Bear Has A Stumpy Tail [Folk Tales Of Flanders]

One very cold winter, when the ground was covered with snow and the ponds and rivers were frozen hard, Reynard the Fox and all the other animals went out to enjoy themselves by sliding and skating on the ice. After a time Reynard began to feel hungry, so he wandered off by himself in search of something to eat. He nosed about here, and he nosed about there; he lay in wait behind bushes in the hope of being able to catch a bird; he lurked by the walls of farmhouses ready to spring out upon any unsuspecting chicken that might show itself, but all in vain. The birds were wary, and the fowls were all safe in the hen-houses.

 

 

The Two Friends And The Barrel Of Grease [Folk Tales Of Flanders]

The Peasant And The Satyrs [Folk Tales Of Flanders]