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How The Monkey And The Goat Earned Their Reputations [Fairy Tales From Brazil] Once upon a time the tiger sent an invitation to the goat ask...

How The Monkey And The Goat Earned Their Reputations [Fairy Tales From Brazil]

How The Monkey And The Goat Earned Their Reputations [Fairy Tales From Brazil]

Once upon a time the tiger sent an invitation to the goat asking the goat to accompany him on a visit. The goat promptly accepted the invitation and at the appointed day they started on their journey to the house of the tiger's friend. On the way there they came to a dangerous marsh. The tiger was afraid to cross it, but he pretended to be very brave. He said to the goat: "Friend Goat, how very pale you look when you think about crossing the marsh. Don't be afraid. Just go ahead."

How The Monkey Became A Trickster [Fairy Tales From Brazil] Once upon a time there was a beautiful garden in which grew all sorts of fruits....

How The Monkey Became A Trickster [Fairy Tales From Brazil]

How The Monkey Became A Trickster [Fairy Tales From Brazil]

Once upon a time there was a beautiful garden in which grew all sorts of fruits. Many beasts lived in the garden and they were permitted to eat of the fruits whenever they wished. But they were asked to observe one rule. They must make a low, polite bow to the fruit tree, call it by its name, and say, "Please give me a taste of your fruit." They had to be very careful to remember the tree's correct name and not to forget to say "please." It was also very important that they should remember not to be greedy. They must always leave plenty of fruit for the other beasts who might pass that way, and plenty to adorn the tree itself and to furnish seed so that other trees might grow. If they wished to eat figs they had to say, "O, fig tree, O, fig tree, please give me a taste of your fruit;" or, if they wished to eat oranges they had to say, "O, orange tree, O, orange tree, please give me a taste of your fruit."

How The Speckled Hen Got Her Speckles [Fairy Tales From Brazil] Once upon a time, ages and ages ago, there was a little white hen. One day s...

How The Speckled Hen Got Her Speckles [Fairy Tales From Brazil]

How The Speckled Hen Got Her Speckles [Fairy Tales From Brazil]

Once upon a time, ages and ages ago, there was a little white hen. One day she was busily engaged in scratching the soil to find worms and insects for her breakfast. As she worked she sang over and over again her little crooning song, "Quirrichi, quirrichi, quirrichi." Suddenly she noticed a tiny piece of paper lying on the ground. "Quirrichi, quirrichi, what luck!" she said to herself. "This must be a letter. One time when the king, the great ruler of our country, held his court in the meadow close by, many people brought him letters and laid them at his feet. Now I, too, even I, the little white hen, have a letter. I am going to carry my letter to the king."

Why The Tiger And The Stag Fear Each Other [Fairy Tales From Brazil] Once upon a time there was a large handsome stag with great branching h...

Why The Tiger And The Stag Fear Each Other [Fairy Tales From Brazil]

Why The Tiger And The Stag Fear Each Other [Fairy Tales From Brazil]

Once upon a time there was a large handsome stag with great branching horns. One day he said to himself, "I am tired of having no home of my own, and of just living anywhere. I shall build me a house." He searched on every hill, in every valley, by every stream, and under all the trees for a suitable place. At last he found one that was just right. It was not too high, nor too low, not too near a stream and not too far away from one, not under too thick trees and not away from the trees out under the hot sun. "I am going to build my house here," he said, and he began to clear a place for it at once. He worked all day and did not go away until night.

Why The Lamb Is Meek [Fairy Tales From Brazil] Once upon a time there was a little lamb frisking gaily about the pasture. The bright sunshin...

Why The Lamb Is Meek [Fairy Tales From Brazil]

Why The Lamb Is Meek [Fairy Tales From Brazil]

Once upon a time there was a little lamb frisking gaily about the pasture. The bright sunshine and the soft breezes made him very happy. He had just finished a hearty meal and that made him happy too. He was the very happiest little lamb in all the world and he thought that he was the most wonderful little lamb.

How The Tiger Got His Stripes [Fairy Tales From Brazil] Once upon a time, ages and ages ago, so long ago that the tiger had no stripes upon ...

How The Tiger Got His Stripes [Fairy Tales From Brazil]

How The Tiger Got His Stripes [Fairy Tales From Brazil]

Once upon a time, ages and ages ago, so long ago that the tiger had no stripes upon his back and the rabbit still had his tail, there was a tiger who had a farm. The farm was very much overgrown with underbrush and the owner sought a workman to clear the ground for him to plant.

How the Toad Got His Bruises [Fairy Tales From Brazil] Once upon a time, ages and ages ago, the toad had a smooth skin. In those days he was...

How the Toad Got His Bruises [Fairy Tales From Brazil]

How the Toad Got His Bruises [Fairy Tales From Brazil]

Once upon a time, ages and ages ago, the toad had a smooth skin. In those days he was a great gad about. He never could be found in his own house. If any one had a party he was sure to go, no matter how far away from home it was held, or how long it took to get there.

How the Rabbit Lost His Tail [Fairy Tales From Brazil] Once upon a time, ages and ages ago, the rabbit had a long tail, but the cat had none...

How the Rabbit Lost His Tail [Fairy Tales From Brazil]

How the Rabbit Lost His Tail [Fairy Tales From Brazil]

Once upon a time, ages and ages ago, the rabbit had a long tail, but the cat had none. She looked with envious eyes at the one which the rabbit had. It was exactly the sort of a tail she longed to have.

How Night Came [Fairy Tales From Brazil] Years and years ago at the very beginning of time, when the world had just been made, there was no ...

How Night Came [Fairy Tales From Brazil]

How Night Came [Fairy Tales From Brazil]

Years and years ago at the very beginning of time, when the world had just been made, there was no night. It was day all the time. No one had ever heard of sunrise or sunset, starlight or moonbeams. There were no night birds, nor night beasts, nor night flowers. There were no lengthening shadows, nor soft night air, heavy with perfume.

Alcestis [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew] F OR many years the remembrance of Apollo's service kept Thessaly full of sunlight. Where a...

Alcestis [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew]

Alcestis [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew]

FOR many years the remembrance of Apollo's service kept Thessaly full of sunlight. Where a god could work, the people took heart to work also. Flocks and herds throve, travellers were befriended, and men were happy under the rule of a happy king and queen.

Admetus And The Shepherd [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew] A POLLO did not live always free of care, though he was the most glorious of th...

Admetus And The Shepherd [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew]

Admetus And The Shepherd [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew]

APOLLO did not live always free of care, though he was the most glorious of the gods. One day, in anger with the Cyclopes who work at the forges of Vulcan, he sent his arrows after them, to the wrath of all the gods, but especially of Zeus. (For the Cyclopes always make his thunderbolts, and make them well.) Even the divine archer could not go unpunished, and as a penalty he was sent to serve some mortal for a year. Some say one year and some say nine, but in those days time passed quickly; and as for the gods, they took no heed of it.

Niobe [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew]  T HERE are so many tales of the vanity of kings and queens that the half of them cannot be told.

Niobe [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew]

Niobe [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew] 

THERE are so many tales of the vanity of kings and queens that the half of them cannot be told.

Phaethon [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew] O NCE upon a time, the reckless whim of a lad came near to destroying the Earth and robbing the...

Phaethon [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew]

Phaethon [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew]

ONCE upon a time, the reckless whim of a lad came near to destroying the Earth and robbing the spheres of their wits.

Icarus and Dædalus [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew] A MONG all those mortals who grew so wise that they learned the secrets of the gods, ...

Icarus and Dædalus [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew]

Icarus and Dædalus [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew]

AMONG all those mortals who grew so wise that they learned the secrets of the gods, none was more cunning than Dædalus.

Orpheus and Eurydice [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew] W HEN gods and shepherds piped and the stars sang, that was the day of musicians! B...

Orpheus and Eurydice [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew]

Orpheus and Eurydice [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew]

WHEN gods and shepherds piped and the stars sang, that was the day of musicians! But the triumph of Phœbus Apollo himself was not so wonderful as the triumph of a mortal man who lived on earth, though some say that he came of divine lineage. This was Orpheus, that best of harpers, who went with the Grecian heroes of the great ship Argo in search of the Golden Fleece.

The Deluge [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew] E VEN with the gifts of Prometheus, men could not rest content. As years went by, they lost a...

The Deluge [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew]

The Deluge [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew]

EVEN with the gifts of Prometheus, men could not rest content. As years went by, they lost all the innocence of the early world; they grew more and more covetous and evil-hearted. Not satisfied with the fruits of the Earth, or with the fair work of their own hands, they delved in the ground after gold and jewels; and for the sake of treasure nations made war upon each other and hate sprang up in households. Murder and theft broke loose and left nothing sacred.

Prometheus [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew] I N the early days of the universe, there was a great struggle for empire between Zeus and th...

Prometheus [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew]

Prometheus [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew]

IN the early days of the universe, there was a great struggle for empire between Zeus and the Titans. The Titans, giant powers of heaven and earth, were for seizing whatever they wanted, with no more ado than a whirlwind. Prometheus, the wisest of all their race, long tried to persuade them that good counsel would avail more than violence; but they refused to listen. Then, seeing that such rulers would soon turn heaven and earth into chaos again, Prometheus left them to their own devices, and went over to Zeus, whom he aided so well that the Titans were utterly overthrown. Down into Tartarus they went, to live among the hidden fires of the earth; and there they spent a long term of bondage, muttering like storm, and shaking the roots of mountains. One of them was Enceladus, who lay bound under Ætna; and one, Atlas, was made to stand and bear up the weight of the sky on his giant shoulders.

The Judgment Of Midas [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew] P AN came at length to be such a wonderful piper with his syrinx (for so he named ...

The Judgment Of Midas [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew]

The Judgment Of Midas [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew]

PAN came at length to be such a wonderful piper with his syrinx (for so he named his flute) that he challenged Apollo to make better music if he could. Now the sun-god was also the greatest of divine musicians, and resolving to punish the vanity of the country-god, and so he consented to the test. For judge they chose the mountain Tmolus, since no one is so old and wise as the hills. And, since Tmolus could not leave his home, to him went Pan and Apollo, each with his followers, oreads and dryads, fauns, satyrs, and centaurs.

The Wood-Folk [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew] P AN led a merrier life than all the other gods together. He was beloved alike by shepherd...

The Wood-Folk [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew]

The Wood-Folk [Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew]

PAN led a merrier life than all the other gods together. He was beloved alike by shepherds and countrymen, and by the fauns and satyrs, birds and beasts, of his own kingdom. The care of flocks and herds was his, and for home he had all the world of woods and waters; he was lord of everything out-of-doors! Yet he felt the burden of it no more than he felt the shadow of a leaf when he danced, but spent the days in laughter and music among his fellows. Like him, the fauns and satyrs had furry, pointed ears, and little horns that sprouted above their brows; in fact, they were all enough like wild creatures to seem no strangers to anything untamed. They slept in the sun, piped in the shade, and lived on wild grapes and the nuts that every squirrel was ready to share with them.

April: The Month Of Spring And Rainbows  [The Red Indian Fairy Book] The Spring Beauty (Chippewa) A N old man was sitting in his lod...

April: The Month Of Spring And Rainbows [The Red Indian Fairy Book]

April: The Month Of Spring And Rainbows [The Red Indian Fairy Book]

The Spring Beauty

(Chippewa)

AN old man was sitting in his lodge, by the side of a frozen stream. It was the end of Winter, the air was not so cold, and his fire was nearly out. He was old and alone. His locks were white with age, and he trembled in every joint. Day after day passed, and he heard nothing but the sound of the storm sweeping before it the new-fallen snow.

May: The Month Of Flowers And Birds  [The Red Indian Fairy Book] The Elves (Iroquois) T HE little Elves of Darkness, so says the old...

May: The Month Of Flowers And Birds [The Red Indian Fairy Book]

May: The Month Of Flowers And Birds [The Red Indian Fairy Book]

The Elves

(Iroquois)

THE little Elves of Darkness, so says the old Iroquois Grandmother, were wise and mysterious. They dwelt under the Earth, where were deep forests and broad plains. There they kept captive all the evil things that wished to injure human beings,—the venomous snakes, the wicked spiders, and the fearful monsters. Sometimes one of these evil creatures escaped and rushed upward to the bright, pure air, and spread its poisonous breath over the Upper World. But such happenings were rare, for the Elves of Darkness were faithful and strong, and did not willingly allow the wicked beasts and reptiles to harm human beings and the growing things.

June: The Beautiful Month [The Red Indian Fairy Book] Why Wild Roses Have Thorns (Salteaux)   L ONG , long ago, Wild Roses had no tho...

June: The Beautiful Month [The Red Indian Fairy Book]

June: The Beautiful Month [The Red Indian Fairy Book]

Why Wild Roses Have Thorns

(Salteaux)  

LONG, long ago, Wild Roses had no thorns. They grew on bushes the stems of which were smooth and fragrant, and the leaves a delicate green. The sweet-smelling pink blossoms covered the bushes. Oh! they were beautiful to see!

  July: The Hot Month [The Red Indian Fairy Book] The Firebird   (Whullemooch) V ERY long ago the Indians of Puget Sound had no fire...

 

July: The Hot Month [The Red Indian Fairy Book]

July: The Hot Month [The Red Indian Fairy Book]

The Firebird

 (Whullemooch)

VERY long ago the Indians of Puget Sound had no fire. They had heard of fire but they had never seen it. They ate all their food raw, and on cold days sat shivering and unhappy. And they had no pleasant lodge fire to gather around on wet nights.

August: The Month Of Water and Forests [The Red Indian Fairy Book] Legend of Niagara and the Great Lakes (Chippewa)   I N old, old ti...

August: The Month Of Water and Forests [The Red Indian Fairy Book]

August: The Month Of Water and Forests [The Red Indian Fairy Book]

Legend of Niagara and the Great Lakes

(Chippewa)  

IN old, old times, on the highest peak of a great mountain dwelt a hunter and his five sparkling daughters. Their lodge was of bright birch bark, and on clear days they could see the distant sea flashing like a silver band.

  September: The Corn Month  [The Red Indian Fairy Book] How Indian Corn Came into the World (Chippewa)   L ONG , long ago, in a beau...

 

September: The Corn Month [The Red Indian Fairy Book]

September: The Corn Month [The Red Indian Fairy Book]

How Indian Corn Came into the World

(Chippewa)  

LONG, long ago, in a beautiful part of this country, there lived an Indian with his wife and children. He was poor and found it hard to provide food enough for his family. But though needy, he was kind and contented, and always gave thanks to the Great Spirit for everything that he received. His eldest son, Wunzh, was likewise kind and gentle and thankful of heart, and he longed greatly to do something for his people.

October: The Month Of Nuts And Witches [The Red Indian Fairy Book] The Nuts of Jonisgyont (Iroquois)   L ISTEN to the Iroquois Grandm...

October: The Month Of Nuts And Witches [The Red Indian Fairy Book]

October: The Month Of Nuts And Witches [The Red Indian Fairy Book]

The Nuts of Jonisgyont

(Iroquois)  

LISTEN to the Iroquois Grandmother. This is a tale of Jonisgyont, the little Squirrel, and how he got wings.

In the Moon of the Falling Nuts, when the forest flames with crimson and gold, and the birds preen their wings to fly to the South, Jonisgyont ran chattering up and down the trees gathering brown nuts for his Winter food.

November: The Month Of Fun And Eating  [The Red Indian Fairy Book]   Coyote the Hungry (Caddo)   I N OW Coyote was always hungry,...

November: The Month Of Fun And Eating [The Red Indian Fairy Book]

November: The Month Of Fun And Eating [The Red Indian Fairy Book]

 

Coyote the Hungry

(Caddo)  

I

NOW Coyote was always hungry, and as he was a coward, he used to sneak about the fields and timber searching for something to eat. One day, as he was walking by the side of a brook, he heard something in a Persimmon Tree. He looked up, and there was Opossum eating Persimmons.

December: The Month Of Gifts  [The Red Indian Fairy Book] The Mud Pony (Skidi Pawnee)   O NCE there was an Indian camp, and in it liv...

December: The Month Of Gifts [The Red Indian Fairy Book]

December: The Month Of Gifts [The Red Indian Fairy Book]

The Mud Pony

(Skidi Pawnee)  

ONCE there was an Indian camp, and in it lived a boy. His parents were very poor, and had no ponies. The boy was fond of ponies, and often sat on the bank of the creek, while the other boys were watering theirs.

January: The Cold Month  [The Red Indian Fairy Book]   Jowiis and the Eagles (Iroquois)   O NE day in the long time ago, Jowiis, an...

January: The Cold Month [The Red Indian Fairy Book]

January: The Cold Month [The Red Indian Fairy Book]

 

Jowiis and the Eagles

(Iroquois)  

ONE day in the long time ago, Jowiis, an Indian lad, was hunting in the woods. It was cold and rainy weather, and the floods had wiped out all the trails. There was no Sun or Moon in the black Sky to guide him, and soon he lost his way. So he wandered for days, until hungry and faint, he fell upon a river-bank to die.

February: The Month Of The Sky And Rocks  [The Red Indian Fairy Book]   The Rolling Rock (Flathead)   O NCE on a time, Coyote dress...

February: The Month Of The Sky And Rocks [The Red Indian Fairy Book]

February: The Month Of The Sky And Rocks [The Red Indian Fairy Book]

 

The Rolling Rock

(Flathead)  

ONCE on a time, Coyote dressed himself in his best beaded clothes, and went for a walk. By and by he met Fox. So they went on together. Coyote had a fine new blanket, but Fox had none. Soon they came to a big smooth Rock. Coyote thought it a very nice Rock.

March: The Month Of The Rabbit And Spring [ The Red Indian Fairy Book ]   How Maple-Sugar Came (Salteaux)   A FTER Nanahboozhoo had...

March: the Month of the Rabbit and Spring [The Red Indian Fairy Book]

March: The Month Of The Rabbit And Spring [The Red Indian Fairy Book]

 

How Maple-Sugar Came

(Salteaux)  

AFTER Nanahboozhoo had given the Wild Roses their thorns, he wandered about the world playing pranks on the Little People of Darkness, so that they determined to be revenged on him and kill his old Grandmother Nokomis. Nanahboozhoo loved his grandmother dearly, and when he knew that the Little People wished to hurt her, he took Nokomis upon his strong back, and flew away with her to a forest.

A Story Of Robin Hood [Fifty Famous Stories Retold] I N the rude days of King Richard and King John there were many great woods in England....

A Story Of Robin Hood [Fifty Famous Stories Retold]

A Story Of Robin Hood [Fifty Famous Stories Retold]

IN the rude days of King Richard and King John there were many great woods in England. The most famous of these was Sherwood forest, where the king often went to hunt deer. In this forest there lived a band of daring men called outlaws.

King John And The Abbot [Fifty Famous Stories Retold]   I . THE THREE QUESTIONS T HERE was once a king of England whose name was John...

King John And The Abbot [Fifty Famous Stories Retold]

King John And The Abbot [Fifty Famous Stories Retold]

 

I. THE THREE QUESTIONS

THERE was once a king of England whose name was John. He was a bad king; for he was harsh and cruel to his people, and so long as he could have his own way, he did not care what became of other folks. He was the worst king that England ever had.

Now, there was in the town of Canterbury a rich old abbot who lived in grand style in a great house called the Abbey. Every day a hundred noble men sat down with him to dine; and fifty brave knights, in fine velvet coats and gold chains, waited upon him at his table.

When King John heard of the way in which the abbot lived, he made up his mind to put a stop to it. So he sent for the old man to come and see him.

"How now, my good abbot?" he said. "I hear that you keep a far better house than I. How dare you do such a thing? Don't you know that no man in the land ought to live better than the king? And I tell you that no man shall."

"O king!" said the abbot, "I beg to say that I am spending nothing but what is my own. I hope that you will not think ill of me for making things pleasant for my friends and the brave knights who are with me."

"Think ill of you?" said the king. "How can I help but think ill of you? All that there is in this broad land is mine by right; and how do you dare to put me to shame by living in grander style than I? One would think that you were trying to be king in my place."

"Oh, do not say so!" said the abbot. "For I"—

"Not another word!" cried the king. "Your fault is plain, and unless you can answer me three questions, your head shall be cut off, and all your riches shall be mine."

"I will try to answer them, O king!" said the abbot.

"Well, then," said King John, "as I sit here with my crown of gold on my head, you must tell me to within a day just how long I shall live. Secondly, you must tell me how soon I shall ride round the whole world; and lastly, you shall tell me what I think."

"O king!" said the abbot, "these are deep, hard questions, and I cannot answer them just now. But if you will give me two weeks to think about them, I will do the best that I can."

"Two weeks you shall have," said the king; "but if then you fail to answer me, you shall lose your head, and all your lands shall be mine."

The abbot went away very sad and in great fear. He first rode to Oxford. Here was a great school, called a university, and he wanted to see if any of the wise professors could help him. But they shook their heads, and said that there was nothing about King John in any of their books.

Then the abbot rode down to Cambridge, where there was another university. But not one of the teachers in that great school could help him.

At last, sad and sorrowful, he rode toward home to bid his friends and his brave knights good-by. For now he had not a week to live.



II. THE THREE ANSWERS

As the abbot was riding up the lane which led to his grand house, he met his shepherd going to the fields.

"Welcome home, good master!" cried the shepherd. "What news do you bring us from great King John?"

"Sad news, sad news," said the abbot; and then he told him all that had happened.

"Cheer up, cheer up, good master," said the shepherd. "Have you never yet heard that a fool may teach a wise man wit? I think I can help you out of your trouble."

"You help me!" cried the abbot. "How? how?"

"Well," answered the shepherd, "you know that everybody says that I look just like you, and that I have sometimes been mistaken for you. So, lend me your servants and your horse and your gown, and I will go up to London and see the king. If nothing else can be done, I can at least die in your place."

"My good shepherd," said the abbot, "you are very, very kind; and I have a mind to let you try your plan. But if the worst comes to the worst, you shall not die for me. I will die for myself."

So the shepherd got ready to go at once. He dressed himself with great care. Over his shepherd's coat he threw the abbot's long gown, and he borrowed the abbot's cap and golden staff. When all was ready, no one in the world would have thought that he was not the great man himself. Then he mounted his horse, and with a great train of servants set out for London.

Of course the king did not know him.

"Welcome, Sir Abbot!" he said. "It is a good thing that you have come back. But, prompt as you are, if you fail to answer my three questions, you shall lose your head."

"I am ready to answer them, O king!" said the shepherd.

"Indeed, indeed!" said the king, and he laughed to himself. "Well, then, answer my first question: How long shall I live? Come, you must tell me to the very day."

"You shall live," said the shepherd, "until the day that you die, and not one day longer. And you shall die when you take your last breath, and not one moment before."

The king laughed.

"You are witty, I see," he said. "But we will let that pass, and say that your answer is right. And now tell me how soon I may ride round the world."

"You must rise with the sun," said the shepherd, "and you must ride with the sun until it rises again the next morning. As soon as you do that, you will find that you have ridden round the world in twenty-four hours."

The king laughed again. "Indeed," he said, "I did not think that it could be done so soon. You are not only witty, but you are wise, and we will let this answer pass. And now comes my third and last question: What do I think?"

"That is an easy question," said the shepherd. "You think that I am the Abbot of Canterbury. But, to tell you the truth, I am only his poor shepherd, and I have come to beg your pardon for him and for me." And with that, he threw off his long gown.

The king laughed loud and long.

"A merry fellow you are," said he, "and you shall be the Abbot of Canterbury in your master's place."

"O king! that cannot be," said the shepherd; "for I can neither read nor write."

"Very well, then," said the king, "I will give you something else to pay you for this merry joke. I will give you four pieces of silver every week as long as you live. And when you get home, you may tell the old abbot that you have brought him a free pardon from King John."

 


The White Ship [Fifty Famous Stories Retold] K ING H ENRY , the Handsome Scholar, had one son named William, whom he dearly loved. The youn...

The White Ship [Fifty Famous Stories Retold]

The White Ship [Fifty Famous Stories Retold]

KING HENRY, the Handsome Scholar, had one son named William, whom he dearly loved. The young man was noble and brave, and everybody hoped that he would some day be the King of England.

The Sons Of William The Conqueror [Fifty Famous Stories Retold] T HERE was once a great king of England who was called William the Conquero...

The Sons Of William The Conqueror [Fifty Famous Stories Retold]

The Sons Of William The Conqueror [Fifty Famous Stories Retold]

THERE was once a great king of England who was called William the Conqueror, and he had three sons.

One day King William seemed to be thinking of something that made him feel very sad; and the wise men who were about him asked him what was the matter.

King Canute On The Seashore [Fifty Famous Stories Retold] A HUNDRED years or more after the time of Alfred the Great there was a king of E...

King Canute On The Seashore [Fifty Famous Stories Retold]

King Canute On The Seashore [Fifty Famous Stories Retold]

A HUNDRED years or more after the time of Alfred the Great there was a king of England named Canute. King Canute was a Dane; but the Danes were not so fierce and cruel then as they had been when they were at war with King Alfred.

King Alfred And The Beggar [Fifty Famous Stories Retold] A T one time the Danes drove King Alfred from his kingdom, and he had to lie hidde...

King Alfred And The Beggar [Fifty Famous Stories Retold]

King Alfred And The Beggar [Fifty Famous Stories Retold]

AT one time the Danes drove King Alfred from his kingdom, and he had to lie hidden for a long time on a little island in a river.

King Alfred And The Cakes [Fifty Famous Stories Retold] M ANY years ago there lived in England a wise and good king whose name was Alfred. ...

King Alfred And The Cakes [Fifty Famous Stories Retold]

King Alfred And The Cakes [Fifty Famous Stories Retold]

MANY years ago there lived in England a wise and good king whose name was Alfred. No other man ever did so much for his country as he; and people now, all over the world, speak of him as Alfred the Great.

The Elephant And The Dog [More Jataka Tales] O NCE upon a time a Dog used to go into the stable where the king's Elephant lived. At fir...

The Elephant And The Dog [More Jataka Tales]

The Elephant And The Dog [More Jataka Tales]

ONCE upon a time a Dog used to go into the stable where the king's Elephant lived. At first the Dog went there to get the food that was left after the Elephant had finished eating.

Beauty And Brownie [More Jataka Tales] T WO Deer named Beauty and Brownie lived with their father and mother and great herds of Deer in a f...

Beauty And Brownie [More Jataka Tales]

Beauty And Brownie [More Jataka Tales]

TWO Deer named Beauty and Brownie lived with their father and mother and great herds of Deer in a forest. One day their father called them to him and said:

Prince Wicked And The Grateful Animals [More Jataka Tales] O NCE upon a time a king had a son named Prince Wicked. He was fierce and cruel,...

Prince Wicked And The Grateful Animals [More Jataka Tales]

Prince Wicked And The Grateful Animals [More Jataka Tales]

ONCE upon a time a king had a son named Prince Wicked. He was fierce and cruel, and he spoke to nobody without abuse, or blows. Like grit in the eye, was Prince Wicked to every one, both in the palace and out of it.

The Wise Goat And The Wolf  [More Jataka Tales] O NCE upon a time, many, many wild Goats lived in a cave in the side of a hill. A Wolf live...

The Wise Goat And The Wolf  [More Jataka Tales]

The Wise Goat And The Wolf  [More Jataka Tales]

ONCE upon a time, many, many wild Goats lived in a cave in the side of a hill. A Wolf lived with his mate not far from this cave. Like all Wolves they liked the taste of Goat-meat. So they caught the Goats, one after another, and ate them all but one who was wiser than all the others. Try as they might, the Wolves could not catch her.

 The Lion In Bad Company [More Jataka Tales] O NE day a young Lion came suddenly upon a Wolf. The Wolf was not able to get away, so he said...

The Lion In Bad Company [More Jataka Tales]

 The Lion In Bad Company [More Jataka Tales]

ONE day a young Lion came suddenly upon a Wolf. The Wolf was not able to get away, so he said to the Lion: "Please, Great Lion, could you take me to your den, and let me live with you and your mate? I will work for you all my days."

The Stolen Plow [More Jataka Tales] A T one time there were two traders who were great friends. One of them lived in a small village, and o...

The Stolen Plow [More Jataka Tales]



The Stolen Plow [More Jataka Tales]

AT one time there were two traders who were great friends. One of them lived in a small village, and one lived in a large town near-by.

The Foolhardy Wolf [More Jataka Tales] A L ION bounded forth from his lair one day, looking north, west, south, and east. He saw a Buffalo ...

The Foolhardy Wolf [More Jataka Tales]

The Foolhardy Wolf [More Jataka Tales]

A LION bounded forth from his lair one day, looking north, west, south, and east. He saw a Buffalo and went to kill him.

The Lion ate all of the Buffalo-meat he wanted, and then went down to the lake for a drink.

The Brave Little Bowman [More Jataka Tales] O NCE upon a time there was a little man with a crooked back who was called the wise little bow...

The Brave Little Bowman [More Jataka Tales]

The Brave Little Bowman [More Jataka Tales]

ONCE upon a time there was a little man with a crooked back who was called the wise little bowman because he used his bow and arrow so very well. This crooked little man said to himself: "If I go to the king and ask him to let me join his army, he's sure to ask what a little man like me is good for. I must find some great big man who will take me as his page, and ask the king to take us." So the little bowman went about the city looking for a big man.

The Hawks And Their Friends [More Jataka Tales] A FAMILY of Hawks lived on an island in a lake not far from the great forest. On the north...

The Hawks And Their Friends [More Jataka Tales]

The Hawks And Their Friends [More Jataka Tales]

A FAMILY of Hawks lived on an island in a lake not far from the great forest. On the northern shore of this lake lived a Lion, King of Beasts. On the eastern shore lived a Kingfisher. On the southern shore of the lake lived a Turtle.

 How The Monkey Saved His Troop [More Jataka Tales] A MANGO-TREE grew on the bank of a great river. The fruit fell from some of the branch...

How The Monkey Saved His Troop [More Jataka Tales]

 How The Monkey Saved His Troop [More Jataka Tales]

A MANGO-TREE grew on the bank of a great river. The fruit fell from some of the branches of this tree into the river, and from other branches it fell on the ground.

  The Otters And The Wolf [More Jataka Tales] O NE day a Wolf said to her mate, "A longing has come upon me to eat fresh fish." &...

 

The Otters And The Wolf [More Jataka Tales]

The Otters And The Wolf [More Jataka Tales]

ONE day a Wolf said to her mate, "A longing has come upon me to eat fresh fish."

"I will go and get some for you," said he and he went down to the river.

The Woodpecker And The Lion [More Jataka Tales] O NE day while a Lion was eating his dinner a bone stuck in his throat. It hurt so that he ...

The Woodpecker And The Lion [More Jataka Tales]

The Woodpecker And The Lion [More Jataka Tales]

ONE day while a Lion was eating his dinner a bone stuck in his throat. It hurt so that he could not finish his dinner. He walked up and down, up and down, roaring with pain.